Madame Tussauds in London. A feng shui analysis.

On 19/10/2012, in Blog, Features, Observations, by Michael Oon

The Madame Tussauds wax museum in London which started in 1883, has consistently been in the top 10 London tourist attractions. Since I have been living in London and have frequently passed this building in Marylebone Road near Baker Street. There has always been queues of people waiting to get into this tourist attraction and […]

Madame Tussauds in London

Madame Tussauds building in London

The Madame Tussauds wax museum in London which started in 1883, has consistently been in the top 10 London tourist attractions.

Since I have been living in London and have frequently passed this building in Marylebone Road near Baker Street. There has always been queues of people waiting to get into this tourist attraction and a number of waiting tourist buses parked nearby. I have always wondered why people would come to this tourist attraction of wax figures of celebrities. Every person has their own individual preferences.

Madame Tussaud was taught by Dr Phillippe Curtius, a physician skilled in wax modelling in Bern, Switzerland. Her first wax figure was Voltaire in 1777. This was followed by creating the models of other famous figures of the time which included Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Benjamin Franklin. She came to London in 1802 to show her wax figures but she was unable to return to France because of the Napoleonic wars. She then took a series of short leases in Baker Street Bazaar. This was an exhibition of famous people like Horatio Nelson and Sir Walter Scott. In 1883 because of the restricted space of the Baker Street site, the museum moved to the present site in Marylebone Road. This became a great success.

This business has since grown to a major tourist attraction and has branches in many parts of the world including Amsterdam, Bangkok, Hollywood, Hong Kong, Las Vegas, New York City, Shanghai, Sydney, Vienna and Washington DC.

The Marylebone Road Site

Google Earth Image of Madame Tussauds in London

Google Earth Image of Madame Tussauds in London. Regents Parks is to the North of the building.

The building is located at the junction of Park Road and Marylebone Road. Park Road is one of the road surrounding Regents Park. The entrances to the building are marked A and B in the Google Earth image.

Initially, I could not understand the feng shui of the property but then it occurred to me was that the energy coming down Park Road was reflected off the buildings across Marylebone Road. The door at B is receiving this energy. As mentioned previously, Regents Park has is a reservoir of energy.

Park Road collects the energy from Regents Park and the energy moves in a southern direction towards Marylebone Road. When it reaches the junction, it hits the buildings across the road and this energy reflects across the Marylebone Road. It is fortuitous that Madame Tussauds building has a door at the furthest end from the junction and readily collects this reflected energy.

Had the door been nearer towards the junction, it would not receive as much of the reflected energy. The door at B is at the ideal position to receive this reflected energy. The door at A would also receives the energy coming down Park Road but it would be in the slip stream in the path of the moving energy.

Conclusion: Madame Tussauds has consistently been in London’s top 10 tourist attractions for decades. The building Madame Tussauds is located in receives plenty of energy from Regents Park. This energy contributes towards the success of this Tourist Attraction.

In the practise of feng shui, the more energy the building receives, this helps in the contribution of the success of the business.

(c) Copyright – Dr Michael Oon. All Rights Reserved Worldwide 2012.

About Michael Oon

Michael Oon has written 145 post in this blog.

Tagged with:  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>